Saturday, November 1, 2008

HANGING SAMPLE: BETTER PHOTO

Posted by Peg in South Carolina

While in Asheville a weekend ago, I also purchased a photography book. It is called simply Digital Camera, Fifth Edition. It is written by Dave Johnson. I do have several photography books already, but when I took a look at this one today, I saw a chapter called “Understand Exposure.” And in that chapter was a section called “Tricky Lighting Situations.” There, in language I can finally understand, it explains how to use metering modes and exposure lock in order to deal with problematic images, like the one on yesterday’s post.

The image on yesterday’s post was really difficult to see. I didn’t know Image1what to do about it in the software. Today, after reading this section, I got my camera out and took some more photos. I tried out the techniques I had learned in that section on tricky lighting situations. To the left is one of the results.

Not a perfect picture by any means—it is now a bit too bright. I could have fiddled some more with the camera or I could have worked some with the software. But I was too excited to get a photo where the fabric was basically visible and somewhat close to what it actually looks like!


Related Post:
Photographing Textiles
Why I Weave as I Do

"Hanging Sample: Better Photo" was written by Margaret Carpenter for Talking about Weaving and was originally posted on November 01, 2008. © 2008 Margaret Carpenter aka Peg in South Carolina

11 comments:

Leigh said...

The photo looks very good indeed. The book sounds like something I should read too.

neki desu said...

Peg,
i did a little something to your photo so you can see what i mean in my post.
send me your e-mail and i'll send it to you.
also check my flickr to see my before photo.

neki desu

bspinner said...

Peg, your picture is great. I'm just an old "aim and shot" when it come to taking pictures. Guess that's why so many of mine don't turn out. Great job!!!

deborahbee said...

I have visited your blog regularly but never left a message as I am somewhat in awe of your expertise! I admire your academic rigor and detailed approach. I can really identify with your complete absorption in the task...thank you for sharing your experiences.

SpinningLizzy (Elizabeth) said...

I thought it would be a simple thing to start weaving and blogging; now I find I need to upgrade my camera, make a lightbox, and delve into photo-editing software... Thank You for blazing the trail!

Rachel said...

Question for you- do you use a tripod? I've found that no matter waht the lighting situation, the use of a tripod can work wonders for getting a really clear pictures, complete with lots of details, perfect for capturing the essence of a weave structure.

Peg in South Carolina said...

Leigh, thank you. Yes, this book seems to be one of the better ones for explaining things to rank amateurs like myself.

Peg in South Carolina said...

bspinner, I am one of those unfortunate persons who always wants to learn more about what she is doing.....(grin!)

Peg in South Carolina said...

deborahbee, you are very welcome and thank you for sharing this with me. I appreciate it.
Elizabeth---oh yes, and double yes.
Rachel--I use a monopod. I tripod would be better, but a monopod is so much easier to deal with, especially in the cramped spaces in which I work. However, I did not use it when I took the pictures of the hanging sample. I took those pictures with the camera sideways and the ball head for the monopod does not swivel in that direction. I have been looking at tripods to find one that might work without costing too much money.......

Geodyne said...

This is a fabulous image. Having seen so many photos of the samples one by one as you wove them, it's fascinating to see them all together. The gold portions do especially stand out.

Peg in South Carolina said...

Thank you, Geodyne.